Interview of Kristen with St.Louis Post-Dispatch for ‘BLLHW’

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There’s no film too big or small for Kristen Stewart

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At age 26, Kristen Stewart has already built a film career that many a young actress would envy. Perhaps best known as Bella Swan, the heroine of the “Twilight” vampire franchise, Stewart has achieved commercial success while earning critical respect. Last summer, she could be found on the cover of Film Comment, the bible of serious moviegoers.

Her latest film, “Billy Lynn’s Long Halftime Walk,” opens Friday. Based on the novel by Ben Fountain and directed by Ang Lee (“Life of Pi”), it’s the story of a heroic soldier, his experience in Iraq and his doubts about being put on patriotic display at a football game. Stewart portrays Lynn’s sister Kathryn, who objects to his plans to return to the war.

In a recent interview, Stewart said that in addressing a soldier’s perspective, two-time Oscar winner Lee has created a film that “externalizes a very internal feeling.” Although Kathryn is a supporting role, she said, it’s one that she felt was worth taking on.

“The part is really economical,” Stewart said. “But it’s really impactful and definitely provides this emotional space.”

“Billy Lynn’s Long Halftime Walk” allowed Lee to experiment with technology. Among the options available is screening the film at 120 frames per second rather than the standard 24, creating an effect that viewers have called hyper-real. But in most theaters, including those in St. Louis, the film will be presented in the usual format.

Stewart said the technology posed unique acting challenges.

“I was out of my element,” she said. “Usually, I’m very aware of the process and really kind of nosey. In this case, it was like swimming around in an Olympic swimming pool. But it was really cool.”

Lee took a similarly experimental approach to “Hulk” (2003), in which he sought to mimic the design imperatives of a comic book.

A native of Los Angeles, Stewart has been acting since she was 9 years old. One of her earliest big-screen roles was as Jodie Foster’s daughter in director David Fincher’s “Panic Room.” Since then she has become one of Hollywood’s highest-paid actresses.

Critics were impressed with Stewart’s supporting work as Julianne Moore’s daughter in “Still Alice” and as Juliette Binoche’s personal assistant in “Clouds of Sils Maria.”

“I’ve known Julianne since I was 12 years old,” she said. “I worked with her husband (director Bart Freundlich) on a movie (‘Catch That Kid’), and she’s always felt like family to me. So playing her daughter, there was an ease to it. We approach our work quite similarly, and I think she’s a really impressive, deeply inspiring woman.”

Stewart describes Binoche — a French actress perhaps best known to American audiences for her Oscar-winning supporting performance in “The English Patient” — as “so powerful and so smart.”

Both Moore and Binoche, she said, are actresses whom she looks up to and who made her “want to rise to the occasion.”

As one of the film industry’s most in-demand actresses, Stewart has her pick of projects. What she looks for in a script, she said, is something that moves her.

“There’s a really particular emotion that occurs inside when you read something that you feel you’d like to join,” she said. The screenplay for “Billy Lynn’s Long Halftime Walk,” written by Jean-Christophe Castelli, “just articulated something really human and something that I really believed in.”

Stewart is just as likely to sign on to a low-profile indie project as to a potential mainstream blockbuster.

“In the case of Ang’s film, the only way to tell that story is big,” she said. “And I have no aversion to big movies if they’re motivated by something important and worthwhile — and they don’t feel like they’re being made for purely cash-in entertainment. That, I’m not into.”

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Source : St.Louis Post-Dispatch

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Kristen, Steve Martin & Ang Lee Interview with Nashville Scene

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Bangkok @ 22:13 BKKLT

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If you’ve read Ben Fountain’s novel Billy Lynn’s Long Halftime Walk — and many have — then you’re well aware of an aspect that distinguishes it from the vast majority of contemporary literature out there. The novel unfolds in third-person present tense, which is an initially strange tonal balancing act that introduces visceral immediacy yet stays an objective distance from its subject. As if determined to remain faithful to that specific choice, director Ang Lee basically developed an entirely new visual technology to embody it.

In its ideal exhibition, Billy Lynn’s Long Halftime Walk is shown in 120-frame-per-second 4K 3-D, a format never before used in feature films. (It opens Friday throughout Nashville, presumably in both 2-D and 3-D engagements; frame rate exhibition is as yet undetermined, but it’s worth asking at your multiplex of choice.) Billy Lynn doesn’t look like a movie at all — it looks like life, just extending further out than we typically expect as viewers. What it does is to maintain that combination of naturalist immediacy that we associate with real experience, and mesh it with the godlike distance of spectator-ship (both as moviegoers and as noncombatants observing combat). And though previous experiments in higher-frame-rate exhibition (Peter Jackson’s Hobbit trilogy) seemed at odds with its representational emphasis, this film — focusing on the titular character and the other surviving members of his combat squad and their surreal 2004 publicity tour as heroes of the Iraq War — immerses itself in military action and sports-derived spectacle, two idioms that make sense in the ultrasmooth, unblinking gaze of HFR video. The following is an edited and condensed version of a discussion with Lee and co-stars Steve Martin and Kristen Stewart that happened at an intimate press gathering the day after the film’s world premiere at the 2016 New York Film Festival.

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Interview of Kristen with the Toronto Sun for ‘BLLHW’

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Bangkok @ 22:07 BKKLT

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Straight from press conference to photo shoot to me, Kristen Stewart is set to promote Billy Lynn’s Long Halftime Walk, when an assistant enters the room and tosses a pack of cigarettes.

Brightening, she rips open the pack, and heads to the hotel window, thoughtfully grabbing my digital recorder (“So you don’t miss anything”) en route to sitting on the sill, a little fidgety and blowing smoke out into the Manhattan air.

So we sat, 10 feet apart, talking about Ang Lee’s awkwardly-titled movie, taken from a Ben Fountain novel about a group of Iraq soldiers who go “viral” with video of their fruitless attempt to save a comrade (Vin Diesel), and who are honoured during halftime of a Texas NFL game (the Cowboys in the book).

They’re followed by an agent (Chris Tucker), who’s intent on turning their story into a Hollywood movie.

Stewart seems to have emerged from the glare of playing Bella Swan in the Twilight series with a remarkable measure of respect. The onetime child actress became the only American ever to win a Cesar (the French Oscar) when she won Best Supporting Actress for Olivier Assayas’ Clouds of Sils Maria

And she owns one of only two female roles of note in Billy Lynn’s Long Halftime Walk – Kathryn, the sister of Billy (Joe Alwyn), who’s furiously trying to get her brother treatment for PTSD before he re-ups for another tour of duty in a pointless war.

But conversation about the film has been hijacked by its cutting-edge technology. Lee shot it at 120 frames per second (24 has been the normal standard for generations), and it was shown in some early screenings in 3D and 4K HD (in Canada it is being shown in 120 fps in three theatres only, with the rest showing it in a 24 fps format). The result is disconcertingly like being in the same room with the actors.

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Interview of Kristen & Joe Alwyn with New Indian Express for “Billy Lynn’s Long Halftime Walk”

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Bangkok @ 20:10 BKKLT

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Kristen Stewart on her upcoming film, Ang Lee, and what scared her on the set. The Twilight saga star plays Kathryn, sister of the protagonist, a soldier named Lynn (Joe Alwyn), in her next film Billy Lynn’s Long Halftime Walk. She also shares screen space with Vin Diesel and Steve Martin. The war drama—based on a book of the same name by Ben Fountain—is directed by Academy Award-winner Ang Lee and is set for release next week. Here, the 26-year-old talks about working with Lee and on understanding her character.

What was it about this project that made you want to be a part of it?

KS : I wouldn’t want to sound super simplistic in saying, ‘I probably would have done anything with Ang’. I grew up on his movies. When it came to be, I was pretty traditional. I read the script and I loved the opportunity to do something really whole and, over the course of four days, I knew that I needed to endow this movie with a lot of what it says in a really short period of time.

Tell us more about the relationship between your character and the protagonist?

KS : There’s an understanding that allows you to love. Somebody that she (Kathryn) loves more than she has loved anyone, comes back, completely unknown. The one thing that kind of tips me out about it is that there’s such a crazy, remote relationship to this, because that’s the only one we could have, and rather than trying to understand him, she wants him to understand himself. Like ‘just think for yourself, understand yourself, I’m not going to push you in any direction because I haven’t walked in your boots’ so to speak. There was one scene where you see him deciding to take someone’s life. I couldn’t watch it. I’ve seen people kill others in movies, but not in this way. In the scariest sense, it lodges you in your body in the most visceral way, in regards to something that may not feel so visceral to us now. That’s what I think the movie does and I’m really thankful to be a part of that.

Since the movie  is the first ever to be shot in super-high-resolution 3D (at 120 frames per second), as an actor how conscious were you about this media?

KS : It’s crazy because half of you feels disconnected because what you’re used to as actors is being observed from a somewhat different perspective and having an unbreakable connection with another person that’s looked at from the outside. And then the other half feels more intimate because you’re engaging with something head on and you know that you’re being looked on directly, and that is a really vulnerable feeling. It’s a very different feeling and it’s not one that I’ve ever had before.

Actor Alwyn on getting under the skin of the lead character (Billy Lynn).

JA : I was called a month before, so the timing was pretty short. But the seven of us did two weeks of boot camp in Atlanta. We had no contact with the outside world. Every day we went through training which was incredibly intense and pushed us to the breaking point. But it also brought us together as a unit. Also, I’m British and Billy is American, but ultimately, even though it’s within this bigger framework of American prejudice and commentary on the war, it’s a very human story about a young boy finding out who he is in the world, where he wants to go and where he belongs. That’s what I tried to hold on to.

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Source : New Indian Express

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Video : Kristen & ‘Billy Lynn’s Long Halftime Walk’ ‘s Cast on the Today Show

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Bangkok @ 20:20 BKKLT

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Kristen , ผู้กำกับ Ang Lee และ ทีมนักแสดง Billy Lynn’s Long Halftime Walk

อัดเทปสัมภาษณ์รายการ The Today Show เมื่อ วันแถลงข่าวที่ NYC : Oct 15,2016

ออกอากาศเช้าวันอังคาร Nov 08,2016

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Source : TODAY

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Kristen Stewart & Laura Dern Talk “Certain Women” with Yahoo Style

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Brisbane @ 21:05 BNELT

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Kristen Stewart and Laura Dern Talk About Living in Montana,

Being Educated in L.A., and Making The Movie ‘Certain Women’

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Photography: Joel Barhamand

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In indie director Kelly Reichardt’s new movie “Certain Women,” Kristen Stewart and Laura Dern, along with Michelle Williams, make up a trio of intersecting women living in Montana facing quiet challenges in their professional and personal lives.

Even though the characters don’t share screen time, Stewart and Dern have the chemistry of old friends. They opened up to Yahoo Style about women in Hollywood, Montana hipsters, and ghosts.
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Kristen & Laura Dern talk ‘Certain Women’ with ELLE US

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 Brisbane @ 20:50 BNELT

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“I don’t like the idea of people thinking that I don’t give a fuck.”
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“Nobody fucking understands or loves like what they do more than me,”
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“so it really kind of hurts. What I don’t give a fuck about is stuff that doesn’t matter.

Don’t get it twisted, you know what I mean? Do not get that shit twisted.”

Kristen Stewart

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Kristen Stewart and Laura Dern Have Giving a F*ck Down to an Art

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Kristen talks about ‘Certain Women’ with Metro #NYFF

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Bangkok @ 10 :16 BKKLT

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Kristen Stewart knew she had to work with Kelly Reichardt. The “Wendy and Lucy” filmmaker’s previous movie, “Night Moves,” starred two of her friends, Dakota Fanning and Jesse Eisenberg. “Both of them were like, ‘Do anything with her!’” she recalls. And so we have “Certain Women,” which tells three stories of women: Laura Dern plays a lawyer who gets involved in a hostage situation; Michelle Williams pops up in the second act as a woman lightly struggling with her marriage. Stewart — now an art house queen, as we elaborated upon here — comes in during the third, playing a frazzled night school teacher who draws the mysterious attention of a lonely young women (Lily Gladstone). It’s a sad movie. And Stewart, 26, loves it that way.


We could just spend most of this interview geeking out over Kelly Reichardt together.

KS : I f—king love her. I’m lucky enough to know her, and I can tell you that her movies really reflect her. You watch one and it’s very distinctly her. That’s kind of rare. And she’s not f—ing copying anyone. She’s able to create this whole environment that focuses on moments that happen in between the moments that people often focus on in movies. There’s something biting about her movies, too. I don’t think you laugh, but you think, ‘That’s funny. That’s really funny.’ That describes her s—t to me.


They have this strange quality, where they’re both naturalistic and droney. At times they’re almost like a piece of spacey ambient music.

KS : Most people don’t make films that aren’t really trying to make you feel something all the time. In her case, it creates a sense of meditation, which is f—king rare. I watch her movies and I’m not thinking about it until afterwards. And they’re slow. They’re f—king quiet. There are a lot of gaps that inspire you to spiral off into tangential thoughts. It so absorbs me.


Her new film is a film about women, but it’s not overtly a political statement, or it doesn’t let itself be defined only by that.

KS : They’re each up against something, but not in a way that’s self-aggrandizing. It’s not like, [shakes fist] “I am going to overcome this adversity!” None of them find resolve. They all want something they can’t have. You’ve got Michelle’s character, who’s kind of f—king with the conventional dynamic of what a marriage is. And then you have Laura’s character acknowledging the illogical nature of bureaucracy, and the fact that men don’t listen to women. But she doesn’t really do anything about it. It doesn’t work out for her. It’s agonizing, but in a quiet way. It’s a grind. They’re all f—king exhausted. These women are so tired. I love that.


What about your character?

KS : My chick just wants to feel f—king valid, and she isn’t going to [feel valid] while doing the things she’s doing. And you’ve got Lily’s character, who just wants a friend. She has a crush on someone and doesn’t even know what the hell that even is. She’s looking in all the wrong places. These people are f—king lonely. And it’s f—king painful. There’s a remoteness to all of them that seems learned, it seems protective. And it’s sad.


The interactions between the characters are so complex and speak to this idea that we’ll never really know anyone. But I’d like to argue that acknowledging that we’ll always get people wrong is kind of a relief.

KS : We’re all so unaware of each other. It’s crazy. But [knowing that] does set you free a little bit. It’s weird. I’m constantly, with every friendship, every f—king family relationship, I’m like, “You need to know me!” Then you realize no one can know anyone. And it is relieving. There’s a relief to that. We never really know each other. On the other hand, that’s isolating and scary.


I’ve found that as I’ve gotten older I’ve gotten more chill about not having a deep connection with every person I meet. And as a result I feel more confident and relaxed, strangely.

KS : Seriously. You just need to relax a little bit. I’ve done that as I’ve gotten older, too. When I was younger I got super-freaked out if there wasn’t a clarity to every exchange. Now it’s like, ‘That’s fine, whatever, I don’t care.’


There’s a fun running gag in “Certain Women”‘s diner scenes where your character keeps ordering food then only takes a couple bites before ditching it.

KS : She just has no time for f—king anything. And she definitely doesn’t do anything that’s nice for herself. And it was such a bitch getting through those meals, because we shot every scene in the diner in one night. So I’m eating the cheeseburger and the grilled sandwich and a sundae and a soup. I thought I was going to die. By the end of the night I was sweating [laughs], like, ‘Oh my god, I’m going to puke.’ It’s everything I would have gotten, but all at the same time. It was gnarly. … hahaaa lollll 

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Source : Metro.Us

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Kristen Stewart felt ‘immense’ yet ‘gentle’ pressure from Ang Lee #BillyLynn

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Bangkok @ 14:50 BKKLT

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Los Angeles“It’s funny—my favorite directors don’t talk very much,” said Kristen Stewart with a smile. She’s blonde and looking lovelier in our recent interview in New York. In her relatively young career, Kristen has been directed by some of cinema’s best. That list now includes Ang Lee.

“It’s this environment that Ang creates that really makes you stand at attention in a way that is intrinsic,” the actress added about the Oscar- and Golden Globe-winning filmmaker who directed her for the first time in “Billy Lynn’s Long Halftime Walk.” She’s dressed in a black jacket and bellybutton-baring blouse and green pants.

In the drama adapted from Ben Fountain’s novel, Kristen plays Kathryn, the sister of the titular character (newcomer Joe Alwyn), who comes home a hero from the Iraq War in 2004. But cracks unfold as Billy and his Bravo Squad are honored in a spectacular halftime show of the Thanksgiving Day football game. Kathryn thinks Billy is suffering from PTSD (posttraumatic stress disorder).

“Ang doesn’t have to say a lot,” Kristen continued about the director known for giving few directions. The star herself is always an articulate interviewee, but this morning, she was more spirited than usual.

Immense pressure

“The script is perfectly put together but further than that, there’s a pressure that is immense but actually gentle. Because there’s a lot of faith in the script.”

The pressure was from the film being shot in groundbreaking 120 frames-per-second 3D, resulting in clarity that magnifies everything on the screen, including the actors’ faces. (But the movie will be shown in 2D in the Philippines.)

“The pressure was hard,” Kristen admitted. “This movie was scary for everyone. Not just because of the technological implications that we were being seen in a way that we’ve never been seen and that we were going to have to let our guards down, or else they were going to seem like facades. “That’s what you’re always trying to do in a movie—be seen, not lie.”

Challenges

Other than the challenges of acting for the first time with two separate 3D cameras, Kristen relished her director’s quiet style. “Ang is very calm. He’s incredibly Zen. There’s something about the way that he sees things and his encouraging desire to find the truth, which sounds cliché.”

“And I’ve never seen a group of people work harder. It was like, everyone was terrified—not in a bad way, but in a really good way.”

For the actress, it helped that her pal, Garrett Hedlund, was in the cast as Sgt. Dime, the leader of the Bravo Company men who develop strong bond after surviving deadly skirmishes.

“I’m good friends with Garrett,” said Kristen. “I’ve known him for years. He was on this movie much longer than me. I got there, and I could see these people who had been through so much, it felt so real to me. I felt like an older sister. I felt protective of these boys. It was real. They love each other.”

“It’s remarkable. He’s (Ang) one of the greatest directors of our time.”

Views on war

On her own views about war, Kristen reflected, “This movie highlights the idea that nobody, or that very few people, go further than what they’re told. And it depends on who’s telling you and what media outlet you’re watching at a given time. That frustration for my generation is real. It repels people from wanting to understand, because it’s hard to. We’re kept in the dark about certain things.”

“The other thing is, the movie encourages you to actually think for yourself. It’s not overtly opinionated in any way. I know my character is a pacifist. And I am, up to not an ideal extent, but just on the fundamental level. That’s how I function—and I stand behind that.

“I’m not the most political person, but in these times, it’s not a matter of claiming to know how you would do things better to make things work. It’s a pretty good time for this movie to come out, because whether you want to fall on this or that side, it’s pretty clear which side I do. Just own what you believe in and please vote.”

Writing and directing

As for her own experience writing and directing the short film, “Come Swim,” described as “a poetic, impressionistic portrait of a man underwater with heartache,” our budding auteur enthused, “It went well. I love it. That’s a great pleasure. You don’t always love what you do. I’m coloring and finishing sound design. In this particular movie, half the story is all in sound.”

“I found the next level, honestly. I don’t draw a huge distinction between acting and directing. For me, they go hand in hand [with] the way I’ve always approached acting. But the difference between the two would be, there’s something more immediate and flippant about acting that I like. But you can do something and walk away from it. Daily. Even by the hour. It’s momentary and more like a knee-jerk reaction.”

“Directing is navigating a city. But it’s still instinct. Also, the thing that I get from making movies that I really love is that we can talk about stuff, in order to not feel so crazy. I feel like we can become closer to each other, do that visually and affect people. And say things together to say them louder.”

“It’s the best feeling I’ve ever had. I’ve never been happier doing anything. I can’t wait to make more video art. I can’t wait to write my feature. I feel like I am more stimulated, feel more driven than I’ve ever felt. I feel like my eyes are wide open. Sometimes, in life, there are certain stages where everything feels possible. I’m really feeling the possibility right now. I definitely credit that first experience.”

Can she be more specific about the short’s storyline? “Oh, it’s pretty impressionistic, and you’ll see,” she teased with a grin. “I don’t want to blow it. It’s 15 minutes. It will speak louder than what I can say right now.”

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Source : inquirer.net Via Team Kristen Site

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Audio / Podcast : Kristen’s interview with Film Comment

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Bangkok @ 19:56 BKKLT

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ฟังเสียงสัมภาษณ์ Kristen กับ Film Comment จาก NYFF

พูดถึง  Personal Shopper , Certain Women  และ  Come Swim

Kristen Stewart took a quick breather from promoting her triptych of new films at NYFF to reflect on collaborating with Olivier Assayas and Kelly Reichardt. She also shares her excitement about stepping behind the camera for the first time.

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ฟังจาก Podcast :  HERE

ฟังจาก SoundCloud  : HERE

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