Photos of Kristen,Taylor Lautner & Stella Maxwell at Moschino Resort Collection 2018 Show L.A. : June 08, 2017

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หลังจากเดินเล่นกันที่ Silver Lake ละแวกบ้าน LF2 ตอนเที่ยง (HERE ) : June 08,2017

ยามค่ำ Kristen ก็ไปให้กำลังใจ Stella ที่หลังเวที แฟชั่น Moschino Resort Collection 2018  มี Sydney Lopez , Gabby , C.J (เล็บชมพู) มาเป็นกองเชียร์

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Stella Maxwell , ‘Moschino’ Designer – creative director, Jeremy Scott & Kristen Stewart

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ที่ Surprise ก็คือ น้องหมา Taylor Lautner มาร่วมงาน After Party ด้วย !!

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Kristen is a Co-Chair at the Brady Center Bear Awards Gala : June 07,2017

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Kristen เป็นประธานร่วม งาน the Brady Center Bear Awards Gala 2017

จัดขึ้นที่ NeueHouse Hollywood , L.A. เมื่อ June 07,2017

The Bear Award จัดขึ้นโดย มูลนิธิ Brady Organization เพื่อเป็นเกียรติแก่  James Scott “Jim” Brady  (Jim “Bear” Brady) โฆษกรัฐบาล ของประธานาธิบดี Ronald Reagan  และ ในปี 1981 Jim ได้รับบาดเจ็บจากกระสุนปืนในเหตุการณ์ลอบสังหาร ประธานาธิบดี Reagan ซึ่งทำให้เขาทุพพลภาพ เป็นแรงผลักดันให้เขาสนับสนุนการควบคุมการซื้อ ขาย บังคับใช้อาวุธปีนในอเมริกา  Jim เสียชีวิตเมื่อปี 2014 นับได้ 33 ปีหลังจากถูกยิง

Brady Campaign มีจุดมุ่งหมายที่ละลดความรุนแรงจากการใช้อาวุธปืน สร้างสังคมของอเมริกันให้มีความปลอดภัยมากขึ้น และ ลดจำนวนผู้เสียชีวิตจากการใช้อาวุธปืนอย่างน้อย 50 % ภายในปี 2025

Kristen Stewart ร่วมเป็นประธานในการจัดงาน  Brady Center Bear Awards Gala ปี 2017 ร่วมกับ Dede Gardner และ Adam McKay และ โปรเจคท์การกำกับภาพยนตร์สั้นเรื่องต่อไปของ Kristen จะเป็นเรื่องเกี่ยวกับ การควบคุมความรุนแรงจากการใช้อาวุธปืน

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Kristen และ Dan Gross ประธานมูลนิธิ Brady Campaign  ป้องกันความรุนแรงจากการใช้ปืน

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“She came to us because she has something she wants to do with this issue. She eagerly shared her idea and without hesitation and is showing up tonight. She is committed to actually doing something, not just lending her name.” : Dan Gross

“I was infatuated with a few classic Americana images that were a little skewed and maybe not as beautiful or as comforting as they might seem on the surface.One of them involved the shattering of the idea that it’s cool to play with toy guns and little kids grow up thinking that’s going to protect and empower them. We kind of take that idea and go, ‘Actually this is something else that could happen,’ and that needs to be considered by people who might not think about that kind of thing.” : Kristen Stewart

Source : PEOPLE

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Dan Gross , Angel Cologne, Kristen Stewart, Courtney Hotaling, Luis Roldan และ Angel Santiago

Angel Cologne คือ ผู้รอดชีวิตจากการยิงกราดสังหารหมู่ที่ Pulse nightclub  ที่ Orlando ปี 2016

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Tom Arnold, Dan Gross, Kristen Stewart, Kevin Quinn  และ January Jones

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Kristen , Chelsea Handler  ผู้ได้รับรางวัล Brady Bear Award ปีนี้ และ January Jones

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Media Photos

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“ใช้เวลาในค่ำคืนนี้ กับ The great Kristen Stewart ที่  The Brady Gala สำหรับการใช้ปืนอย่างปลอดภัย ที่แอลเอ และเพื่อนเก่า จากมัธยม และ มหาวิทยาลัย ที่แอคลิฟอร์เนียร์” @jzquinn

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Videos

 

Source : Videos by @chrissgardner

Media Photos@chrissgardner | instagram| jane quinn

|@extratv |@BradyCenter Via @queennn94

HQ Thanks to @KStewartBR | @AdoringKS

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New/Old Photo of Kristen and C.J. in California : May 06,2017

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รูปของ Kristen & C.J. ที่งานรวมรุ่นไฮสคูลแห่งหนึ่งใน Santa Ynez จัดขึ้นที่ Solvang Brewing.Co

จากเสื้อผ้าที่ Kristen & C.J. สวมอยู่ บอกได้ว่าเป็นชุดเดียวกับที่สวมไป งานแต่งงานของ Ruth ที่ Santa Ynez

และ ไม่น่าใช่รวมรุ่นเพื่อน ม.ปลายของ Kristen เพราะเธอเรียน Home School ไม่ได้เรียนในโรงเรียน

และ โรงเรียนนี้ก็อยู่ไกลจากบ้านของ Kristen กว่า 200 กิโล

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Source : Via @KristenNetwork

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Fan Photo & Interview of Kristen with Rama Screen ‘Personal Shopper’ L.A. Press Junket

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In writer/director Olivier Assayas’s new film, “Personal Shopper, Kristen Stewart basically plays the title character, a high-fashion personal shopper to the stars who is also a spiritual medium. So at the press roundtable, thanks to IFC Films, I asked Kristen Stewart, who herself is a hugely successful star most famously known for her work in the “Twilight” franchise, if she has her own personal shopper or if she’d ever hire one. Stewart says she doesn’t and further explains why…

“I guess certain celebrities would have that. People that are like extraordinarily rich and strange. But I like clothes.”

Ya, I don’t see her as the kind of celeb either. One of the things I’ve always liked about Kristen Stewart, at least my impression of her, from my having covered several of her press junkets, is that what others may consider to be a big deal, she doesn’t necessarily see it the same way.

But Kristen Stewart fully understood when she took on this role that her character did think of this as a big deal in terms of desiring or envying certain fashion style or expensive clothes.

“I like that she was like at once really attracted to something she also felt partially or potentially empty. There’s a vanity surrounding wanting to look good in clothes, this self-obsessed thing that you have to have in order to be like ‘O my god I can imagine myself in that, I want to feel that.’ So I know that feeling of ‘No, I should be the one wearing that.’ But at the same time, that’s absurd. I don’t want to be the person that thinks like that. So I have less trouble navigating that because I have access and choice which is the luckiest thing in the world. Whereas she is in a position where she’s attracted to something and servicing this thing but so much smaller and kind of resents it but at the same time she’s aggrandizing it.”

Director Olivier Assayas also chimed in, stating that Kristen’s character in this movie is the kind of person who works for people who do a lot of representation, who do a lot of red carpet stuff and since you can’t be on the red carpet wearing the same outfit every single time, they hire somebody who helps get different fancy clothes for them.

And when asked if she got to keep some of the dresses she wore in this film, Kristen Stewart only said she kept one, the dress with the harness. Frankly, I saw “Personal Shopper” only once and a while ago, so I’m not able to recall which specific dress she was referring to. But “Personal Shopper” is more than just fashion, dresses and clothes, it’s also a very unique, very different kind of a ghost story. Not the ghost-busting action type and not the Demi Moore-Patrick Swayze molding clay romance type either, but this one is very internal and very intimate. Find out for yourself when “Personal Shopper” hits theaters near you, March 10.

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Source : Rama Screen

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Compilation Videos & Photos of Kristen from “Personal Shopper” Press Junket in L.A. : Mar 07,2017

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Kristen Stewart is a proud member of the LGBT community. 


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Kristen Stewart Talks Getting Naked in “Personal Shopper”
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E! News’ Marc Malkin caught up with the actress while promoting her latest film Personal Shopper, and when asked about the viral Saturday Night Live moment in which she joked about being “like, so gay,” Kristen Stewart explained her thought process going into it.

“Honestly, I think it was just funny,” she shared. “Not to diminish the point because I think that saying things so bluntly is absolutely important, but at the same time, the only reason I haven’t ever done that is because there is an ambiguity to that and I wanted things to be really real for me.”

“But honestly, it just worked for the joke,” Stewart, 26, continued, adding that the confession was like a “smack” as she clapped her hands together.

Kristen clarified, “It wasn’t like, ‘Let’s do this thing that’s going to be so important.’ I just thought it was like a nice, light… and also yeah, I’m so utterly proud that I’ve had so many people be like, ‘Thank you,’ and I’m like, ‘No, thank you.’ It’s kind of mutual, full circle.”

Stewart also discussed stripping down to her birthday suit for nude scenes in the upcoming drama, an experience she called “empowering.” She told us, “I didn’t feel encumbered at all. Quite the opposite actually.”

She added, “Those [scenes] for me were really empowering, not because I was taking my clothes off, but just because I was getting to the most primal part of that [character], finally, someone who’s really closed off. So then I felt like they were the most revealing, but also the most empowering scenes.”

Source : E! Online

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Kristen & Olivier Assayas Talk ‘Personal Shopper’ with IndieWire

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How Kristen Stewart and Olivier Assayas Bring the Dead Back to Life in ‘Personal Shopper’

The ghost movie inspires personal reflection on the experience of losing a loved one, and it may be the ideal vessel for exploring the grieving process.

“Oh my God. Fuck!” I had just asked Kristen Stewart if she finds texting to be stressful — it would appear that she does. “You start texting with someone and you’re just like, ‘Okay, that was the perfect thing to say,’ and then you look at it after and you read all of your texts together as a whole, as a visual thing, and it’s just…” She trailed off and turned up her palms.

Olivier Assayas, spilling over the bench beside me, sat up and seized on the momentary silence: “Text messaging is the one modern form of communication. It’s unique. It’s special. It’s something new.”

The same could be said of “Personal Shopper,” which reinvents the ghost story by approaching it with radical directness and a singularly modern sense of self. The movie is among the most affecting depictions of the grieving process I’ve ever seen. And somehow, despite the fact that it includes a scene in which a phantom projectile scream-vomits hot white ectoplasm into the air above Stewart’s face, it’s also one of the most realistic. Bracingly direct one moment and stubbornly elliptical the next, “Personal Shopper” isn’t just a story about a young woman trying to connect with her brother across the beyond, it’s also a story about how technology shapes the way people remember the dead and process their absence. Spiritualists are magnetized to spectacle, so it’s only natural that Maureen is constantly staring at her iPhone, using it to google the paintings of Swedish mystic Hilma af Klint or watch an amusing clip from a (fake) old TV drama in which Victor Hugo conducts a hokey séance. These digital communions lend Assayas’ laconic thriller the feeling of a Russian nesting doll, each layer hiding a new dead body.In the film’s already notorious centerpiece, Stewart’s character is peppered with aggressive, sexually charged SMS messages from an unknown number as she rides the Eurostar train from Paris to London and back again. Stretching between 20 minutes, two countries, and possibly into the afterlife, the scene assumes a sudden new shiver when Maureen begins to wonder if she’s texting with her brother’s ghost, or perhaps a more malevolent spirit.

That the gripping sequence caused such a stir following the film’s Cannes premiere is ridiculous for at least two reasons: For one thing, it may be the 21st Century’s signature episode of Hitchcockian suspense. For another, it’s also the stuff of vintage Assayas, crystallizing what the cinema’s reigning modernist has done so well for the last 30 years.

In “Summer Hours,” three far-flung siblings are forced to negotiate their collective identity when their mother bequeaths them the rustic family estate and a laundry list of keepsakes that have always lived inside. In “Clouds of Sils Maria,” Stewart’s first collaboration with Assayas, middle-aged actress Maria Enders (Juliette Binoche) is as haunted by her own legend and tormented by the next generation of starlets. “Personal Shopper” may be the first time that Assayas’ has explicitly engaged with the supernatural, but all of his movies feel like ghost stories.

So much so, in fact, that “Personal Shopper” might seem a touch on the nose, like David O. Russell making a film about Martin Scorsese or Wes Anderson making a film about tweed. Assayas laughed at this suggestion: “Well, movies are about ghosts! Especially old movies. People became aware of whatever cinema was in the late ’50s, early ’60s, when the first generation of silent actors were gone, and, all of a sudden, you had these movies that were just full of specters. So film has always been the land of the dead.”

Even Maureen’s interactions with the living begin to assume a morbid gloss. She and her far-flung boyfriend speak exclusively over Skype, and every conversation feels like a seance. “It’s like they’re conjuring each other,” Stewart said. The line between the living and the dead feels hazy and permeable, so when Maureen suggests the mysterious texts she’s receiving might be from her brother, it’s surprisingly easy to imagine she could be right.

“People feel so entitled to communication in the digital age,” Stewart offered without a perceptible trace of judgement. “I think mourning has probably changed because we’re so in each other’s faces no matter where we are geographically. Now imagine someone passes away and you’re like, ‘What do you mean I can’t talk to them? I can always talk to them.’”

“I don’t know,” Stewart exhaled, snapping me out of my daydream. “I haven’t had too many friends pass away, and my grandma’s a hundred years old. I haven’t dealt with death a whole lot, and, if I have, it’s been sort of peripheral. I can’t imagine going back and knowing that my entire text thread with this person is still there and they’re not. People’s Facebooks become memorial-type things. I think having this data in our hands all the time, depending on how you approach it, can be really scary because it’s a rabbit hole. It gives you an opportunity to know more than you could remember without it. Is it better to let things go and be affected by them, or always have it there to dwell on?”

For a very long moment, I worried that Stewart expected me to answer, as if that question hadn’t been weighing on me for months. Finally, she let me off the hook:

“Who knows?”

Kristen Stewart is one of the most famous people on the face of the planet, but you’d never know it from talking to her, or from watching her recent movies. It’s been four years since she fulfilled her obligation to “The Twilight Saga” and slipped free from the undead grip of the YA franchise that launched her to stardom. In that time she’s played Steve Carrell’s secretary, Juliette Binoche’s assistant, a young lawyer in rural Montana, a prison guard at Guantanamo Bay, and an anonymous drone in a dystopian society founded upon the idea of suppressing the things that make people special.

She’s been drawn to parts that contradict her outsized public persona, confront the all-seeing eye of her celebrity, and warp it into a lens through which we might all look at her more clearly. “Most people are concentrating on their role and trying to immerse themselves and whatever,” she told IndieWire this past summer, “But I don’t want to lose myself, I don’t want to fall, I don’t want to hide. I want to be seen.”

Looking at her, Stewart is textured with the endearing anxiety that characterizes her on-screen persona. She bites her lip, shifts her eyes, takes each breath without seeming to know where it might take her in return, and at no point did she say something easy at the expense of saying something honest. “It’s more interesting to watch someone figure something out and flounder rather than just regurgitate what they were inspired by,” she blurted out somewhere along the way, doing her best to demystify the appeal that has made her an unlikely critical favorite. “I’ve had to throw myself into things I disagree with or confuse me or make me very uncomfortable — self-hating, sometimes. But because I started so young, I wound up on the other side of some experiences having my mind completely changed. I’ve had some really positive things come out of stuff that initially filled me with disdain.”

I wasn’t about to ask what “stuff” she meant, but she was still quick to shut the door behind her: “‘Forge ahead’ is kind of my motto.”

“Personal Shopper” epitomizes Stewart’s penchant for playing beautiful people who do invisible jobs, a contrast that allows the actress to explore the expressive power of her own vulnerability. The film finds her more exposed than ever before, naked in every sense of the word. When she’s not trying to commune with the spirit of her dead brother, Maureen works for a hostile, high-powered fashionista who seldom appears on screen. She runs errands around Paris and beyond, slipping into (and out of) the clothes she’s picking up for her boss, looking to see if each new costume can tell her more about herself than she can glean from her own nude body.

“Maureen is like half a person,” Stewart said. “She’s lost half of herself.” By night, she looks for that missing portion in the musty corners of her dead twin’s haunted chateau. By day, she looks for it in the mirrors of Paris’ trendiest haute boutiques, and finds herself both intrigued and ashamed by a reflection of femininity that seems newfound, now that her brother is no longer here to balance it out.

“Because we do not know anything about Maureen’s backstory, she’s any one of us,” Assayas said. “To me, she has a normal life, longings, a boyfriend, and then, all of a sudden, the world collapses. I think she’s a blank page.” Stewart vigorously nodded in agreement as the director hunched forward and looked her way. He continued: “She’s on her own with an absence, so she’s a foreigner; the world around her is not her world. She’s in a situation where, really, it’s all about trying to survive, reconstruct herself, find her path, and there’s no interference because she’s on her own, because she’s in a strange land.” It’s unclear if he was talking about the character he wrote or the actress for whom he wrote it.

“I was a shell of a human,” Stewart recalled of the production, her voice crackling with the adrenalized glee of someone who just survived a near-death experience. “It’s funny … there’s a basic, fundamental list of questions that you should know the answers to before you shoot. Not ‘should,’ you actually have to know who this person is before the story picks up. In retrospect, it’s fucking crazy to think about — I knew nothing [about Maureen] that wasn’t in the script, and I didn’t ask. I didn’t think about it.”

“I was such a basic, unencumbered, un-opinionated baby!” She went on, speaking faster with every word. “I knew fucking nothing, and it was a nice feeling. And scary. Definitely precarious. But that’s a nice place to stand. I was only aware of what we were doing after the fact on this, and that’s very personal.”

More personal than her performance in “Clouds of Sils Maria?” Stewart answered without taking a breath, she’d clearly considered this: “It feels more personal because I felt more reduced. I felt like the only way I could’ve ever come to a natural discovery or realization was to deconstruct myself completely.”

If “Personal Shopper” is the movie that Stewart has been working toward, best articulating the casual fearlessness that has become her signature, it’s because none of her other roles have taken her so deep into the unknown. “I wasn’t lost,” she insisted. “I wasn’t so unaware that I was like, ‘I don’t know what I’m doing.’ It’s just that I was so open to not knowing. I wasn’t making a movie anymore. I wasn’t trying to lead anyone anywhere. I was just very aware of the fact that some questions have answers in retrospect, but can only ever be asked spiritually and without words.”

I felt like Stewart was trying to say (without saying) that she was able to portray grief so well precisely because she had never really experienced it for herself. In the moment, that sentiment made all the sense in the world to me, and in the time since — as I’ve wrestled with this film and fought my way through the paralytic fog of trying to write about it — it has increasingly felt like the only honest approach.

Stewart would rather drown than tread water, and Assayas was smart enough to let her jump into the deep end of the pool. “We are on our own,” the director explained of his willingness to strand his leading lady like that. “The process of grieving is lonesome. You can discuss it with your best friend, but it will do you not much good, ultimately. Whatever good can come out of it is something that comes through you.”

What Assayas knew, and what “Personal Shopper” invites Stewart to share with us through her own experience, is that loss isn’t just a process of deprivation, but also one of dislocation. Grief, in my limited frame of reference, is like getting lost on the street where you’ve lived your whole life. It’s a dreadful state of nonsense. It’s not something for which you can adequately prepare in advance. And Assayas’ film respects that — it is pockmarked with ellipses that are never filled, crucial details that are left off-screen, questions that are unanswered as Maureen is slowly thrown back upon herself.

Losing someone is a fact, but it’s a fact that has to be learned like a language. You cry uncontrollably, harder than you have since you were an infant, because you don’t have the words to express how you feel. They come to you, but they come to you slowly and in puzzle pieces you lack the grammar to put together. And when you finally figure out how to speak, when you finally figure out how to take the negative space between all your missing pieces and arrange them into sentences, your only reward is the realization that you’ve been talking to yourself the whole time. What “Personal Shopper” ultimately expresses better than any other movie is that grief begins as a process of reconciling yourself to all the ways in which someone is gone, but it ends as a process of recognizing all the ways in which they’re still here. Still a part of you.

“Wherever we leave Maureen,” Assayas concluded, talking around the powerfully elliptical coda that closes out his new film, “she’s decided, ultimately, that her brother is within her, and that he will stay there.” The director thought about that for a moment, turning the words over in his head. “You’re really on your own with grieving.”

But thanks to films like “Personal Shopper,” that’s not entirely true.

On a long-enough timeline, every movie is a ghost story.

I watched “Personal Shopper” again after speaking to Stewart and Assayas. I thought about how Maureen convinced herself (and me) that she was receiving texts from the afterlife, about all the ways in which she attempts to contact her dead brother, and it occurred to me that this is a film about a woman who thinks she’s looking for a doorway, but spends most of her time staring into mirrors. Maureen might be able to see electrical ghost energy as it crackles around a darkened hallway, but she’s more haunted than any of the houses that she’s hired to investigate. She sees her brother within herself, and everything else is just a trick of the light.

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Source : Indie Wire

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Kristen attends ‘Personal Shopper’ Q&As at the Landmark and the Arclight Theater in L.A : March 10, 2017

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Full Video : Q & A at The Landmark Theatre L.A.
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Kristen Attends ‘Personal Shopper’ Premiere in L.A. : Mar 07,2017

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London @ 22:22 GMT

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Kristen และ ผู้กำกับ Olivier Assays ร่วมงานพรีเมียร์ “Personal Shopper”

จัดขึ้นที่  The Carondelet House , L.A. : March 7, 2017

Kristen โกนผมเพื่อรับบท Norah ในโปรเจคท์ใหม่ Underwater

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Pics of Kristen , Stella & Charlotte Out – About in L.A. : Mar 02,2017

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Bangkok @ 20:00 BKKLT

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รูปของ Kristen , Stella และ Charlotte ที่เพิ่งเดินทางมาจากลอนดอน

ออกไปซื้ออาหารให้ Bear , Bernie & Cole ที่ ร้านประจำย่าน Los Feliz : Mar 02,2017

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Kristen attends Charles Finch & CHANEL’s Pre Oscars Dinner : Feb 25,2017

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Copenhagen @ 08:18 CET

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Kristen ร่วมงาน Charles Finch & CHANEL’s Pre Oscars Dinner : Feb 25, 2017

ที่ Madeo Restaurant,  Beverly Blvd., Los Angeles,

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Makeup by Jillian Dempsey

Hair by Adir Abergel

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Kristen และ กระเป๋า CHANEL “Gabrielle  กับ วง Mexican Mariachi
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